Loch Leitir Easidh

Directions: Park at the car park at NC 172262 on the A837 just before Loch Assynt Lodge. There is an all-abilities disabled access path to the loch, where there is an excellent boat, a jetty and boathouse and a toilet.

Accessibility - All Abilities Access
This loch is part of the All Abilities walk developed by the Culag Community Woodland Trust (CCWT).

It has a boat on it that has been made suitable for disabled access, changeable for left and right handed use and with the option to sit astride rather than only forward or back facing.

You can go on from here to Loch nah-Innse Fraoich which is nearby. It also makes an excellent spot for families, with toilet facilities at each loch and easily accessed.

Details

OS Grid: NC169264
Decimal: 58.188287, -5.116309
Degrees: 58° 11' 17.8332" N, 5° 6' 58.7124" W
Permit details: £5/day, £25/week from usual outlets

Tell Us About It!

Please tell us about your experience of fishing at this loch. This will help other anglers as well as local angling groups.

Your feedback is important so please tell us:

  • Where you fished, when, what conditions were like.
  • What you caught, when and on what (be a little vague if you don't want to give it all away!)
  • Anything other anglers should be aware of - access, reeded up waters, difficulties etc.

Please use the COMMENT FORM at the BOTTOM of the page.

Got photos? Email them to us: anglingresearch [at] substance.coop

Comments

Loch Leitir Easidh

On a bright sunny and warm (27C) July 2017 day, I decided to fish this loch moving up the east bank from the jetty. Immediately I realised the difference in an area protected by deer fencing - the heather and thyme was nearly waist high, and fishing from the bank was extremely difficult. I landed one small trout on a yellow palmer, and I hooked another very lively trout which took to the air and released itself from a debarbed black mini-lure. But I spent much of my time untangling my line from the heather. I don't know what the wading is like - I was wearing boots.
On the following day (wednesday), there were gale force winds - so no fishing, but these moderated on the thursday, dropping to a near calm at times, so I decided to try the boat on this loch in the afternoon and evening. The boat is extremely stable, and is moored beside a jetty - so there is no need to pull it down from a bank - which can sometimes defeat a sole angler. But the rowlocks and the (new) oars were not ideal. I found that I needed to row with my hands uncomfortably high to bite the water, and on attempting to apply significant force, the oars jumped out of the rowlocks. I talked to Peter about this, and he advised starting off gently, and letting the speed of the boat build up, without the need to apply much force.
I found little interest to flies pulled across the surface, and only started to contact fish when I let my flies sink slowly (on an intermediate line). I landed, and returned 5 trout, one of which was the blackest trout I have experienced. I carried out most of my fishing up the far end and along the east spur. I had most success with a size 12 long shank teal red and silver.

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